The Queen’s name was Scota – from where comes the name Scotland. The Greek King is said to be Gaythelos – hence Gaelic, and their son was known as Hiber – which gives us Hibernia.

Bower was not the first to propose this lineage for the Scots. The story goes back further and was even included in The Declaration of Arbroath. This seminal document – written in 1320 by the Barons and noblemen of Scotland – was a letter imploring the Pope to intervene on their behalf during the Wars of Independence. The text refers to “the ancients” who “journeyed from Greater Scythia … and the Pillars of Hercules … to their home in the west where they still live today”.

According to tradition, this royal Family, an Egyptian Princess and daughter of a pharaoh who fled from Egypt with her husband Gaythelos with a large following of People, who arrive in a fleet of ships was expelled from Egypt during a time of great uprising. They sailed west, settling initially in Spain before travelling to Scotland for a while, until they were forced to leave and landed in Ireland, where they formed the Scotti, and their kings became the high kings of Ireland. In later centuries, they returned to Scotland, defeating the Picts, and giving Scotland its name.

Egyptian influence was found in Tara, Ireland when an ancient stone-age burial chamber, known as the ‘Mound of Hostages’ was excavated in 1955. The mound itself is Neolithic (c.3000B.C.), the remains of a much later Bronze Age inhumation were discovered, and turned out to be that of an 18-year-old youth who was buried wearing a necklace of Egyptian ‘Faience’ beads. These beads were found to be of genuine Egyptian origin, and unknown in Northern Europe. The skeleton was carbon dated to c. 1350 B.C; around the time that Scota and her husband are supposed to have fled Egypt.

The Queen’s name was Scota – from where comes the name Scotland. The Greek King is said to be Gaythelos – hence Gaelic, and their son was known as Hiber – which gives us Hibernia.

Bower was not the first to propose this lineage for the Scots. The story goes back further and was even included in The Declaration of Arbroath. This seminal document – written in 1320 by the Barons and noblemen of Scotland – was a letter imploring the Pope to intervene on their behalf during the Wars of Independence. The text refers to “the ancients” who “journeyed from Greater Scythia … and the Pillars of Hercules … to their home in the west where they still live today”.

According to tradition, this royal Family, an Egyptian Princess and daughter of a pharaoh who fled from Egypt with her husband Gaythelos with a large following of People, who arrive in a fleet of ships was expelled from Egypt during a time of great uprising. They sailed west, settling initially in Spain before travelling to Scotland for a while, until they were forced to leave and landed in Ireland, where they formed the Scotti, and their kings became the high kings of Ireland. In later centuries, they returned to Scotland, defeating the Picts, and giving Scotland its name.

Egyptian influence was found in Tara, Ireland when an ancient stone-age burial chamber, known as the ‘Mound of Hostages’ was excavated in 1955. The mound itself is Neolithic (c.3000B.C.), the remains of a much later Bronze Age inhumation were discovered, and turned out to be that of an 18-year-old youth who was buried wearing a necklace of Egyptian ‘Faience’ beads. These beads were found to be of genuine Egyptian origin, and unknown in Northern Europe. The skeleton was carbon dated to c. 1350 B.C; around the time that Scota and her husband are supposed to have fled Egypt.

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