The Monroe Doctrine

The Monroe Doctrine was America’s response to the Jesuits’ Congresses of Vienna [in 1814-15] and Verona [in 1825]. America would consider it an act of war if any European nation sought colonial expansion in the Western Hemisphere. The Jesuits have been able secretly to attack and infiltrate America to accomplish exactly what the Monroe Doctrine was stated to protect against. They [i.e., the Jesuits] have been able to get away with it because it was done with utmost secrecy and under the façade of being a church.

The Monroe Doctrine challenged any advance on America by Europe. However, [President] Monroe did not really understand that the crafty Jesuits would not initially use the force of arms to gain their objectives. They [i.e., the Jesuits] would use cunning, craftiness, and utmost secrecy. They would appeal to men’s basest points. They would plant their agents in positions of wealth and power [Ed. Note: such as in the U.S. Congress and in U.S. intelligence agencies] and then use their influence to gain their great prize – the subversion and destruction of every Protestant principle as outlined in the Constitution of the United States.” – Bill Hughes (From his book The Secret Terrorists)

The Monroe Doctrine was a U.S. foreign policy regarding domination of the American continent in 1823.

The threat under the secret treaty of Verona to suppress popular governments in the American Republics is the basis of the Monroe doctrine. This secret treaty sets forth clearly the conflict between monarchial government and popular government and the government of the few as against the government of the many.

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